podcasts

Don't give antidepressant 1st

Don't give antidepressant 1st

WASHINGTON - The idea that inflammation is the mechanism of action in bipolar disorder has changed treatment algorithms. In this interview conducted by Whitney McKnight of Clinical Psychiatry News, Dr. Roger McIntyre, Professor of Psychiatry and Pharmacology at the University of Toronto and Head of the Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit at the University Health Network, Toronto, Canada, shares highlights from the most up-to-date guideline available for the treatment of bipolar disorder.

Talking out migraine pain

Talking out migraine pain

PHILADELPHIA – Which comes first, the migraine or the anxiety and depression? At the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, Dr. Deborah Friedman, professor of neurology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, suggests that patients can use cognitive-behavioral therapy rather than medication to best address the migraine-related anxiety and depression, possibly improving their ability to cope with their migraine by allowing them better insight into its impact.

Depressed or distressed?

Depressed or distressed?

WASHINGTON – Is it depression, or distress and demoralization? In this interview, Dr. James L. Griffith, the Leon M. Yochelson Professor and chair of the department of psychiatry and behavioral Sciences at George Washington University, Washington, discusses the clinical signs of all three, and offers his thoughts on how to confidently diagnose and treat them.

Antipsychotics for kids?

Antipsychotics for kids?

CHICAGO – At best, only a third of adults treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for obsessive-compulsive disorder respond to adjunctive therapy with the second-generation antipsychotic risperidone.

Future of psychiatry, part 2

Future of psychiatry, part 2

HOLLYWOOD, FLA. Dr. Thomas Insel, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, who is both a psychiatrist and a neuroscientist, is supporting President Barack Obama’s BRAIN Initiative. The 12-year vision with a projected $4.5 billion price tag that goal has among its aims. The hope is that the initiative will help determine biomarkers aimed at finding effective cures for a variety of mental illnesses.

The future of psychiatry, part 1

The future of psychiatry, part 1

HOLLYWOOD, FLA. – Imagine if you’d gone to medical school with the intention of becoming a psychiatrist, only to be told that part of your core curriculum would include a course on biomaterials engineering or nanoscience.

How PTSD got its name

How PTSD got its name

WASHINGTON Throughout history the diagnosis "posttraumatic stress disorder" has been called many things and been defined by a variety of presentations. In this interview, Col. Elspeth Cameron Ritchie, U.S. Army retired, and an Army psychiatrist, examines how the term PTSD came to be and the elements of existentialism that are inherent within it.

Moral Injury and PTSD

Moral Injury and PTSD

WASHINGTON How does killing another person because you’ve been commanded to affect one’s mental health? Does it bring on an existential crisis, and does that contribute to posttraumatic stress disorder? Col. Elspeth Ritchie, U.S. Army retired and an Army psychiatrist, explains how participating in "vast amounts of death and destruction" affects a person’s ability to cope afterward.

Time for psychiatry's Darwin

Time for psychiatry's Darwin

LAS VEGAS – A more-specific nomenclature of depression would help in the prescribing of better treatments or might prevent it altogether, according to Dr. Vladimir Maletic, a psychiatrist who spoke at this year’s Nevada Psychiatric Association’s annual Psychopharmacology update meeting.

Where's his head at?

Where's his head at?

BETHESDA, MD.--Dr. Joshua Gordon, director of the NIMH, discusses where he sees mental health research's future headed.

Antipsychotics for kids?

CHICAGO – At best, only a third of adults treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for obsessive-compulsive disorder respond to adjunctive therapy with the second-generation antipsychotic risperidone.

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